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The Big Melt
http://video.nytimes.com/video/playlist/the-big-melt/1194811622279/index.html?ref=thebigmelt

Andrew C Revkin, Simon Romero, The New York Times

This is a collection of five short videos - The Arctic Ice Cap, Sampling the Ice, Arctic Fisheries, Natives Feel Effect and Arctic Energy -- that can be played separately or in sequence. They show how climate change is affecting fishing, native populations and access for the oil and gas industry in the Arctic. The videos include personal reflections by writers Andrew C. Revkin and Simon Romero , scientists and residents about their experience of the impacts of the climate change in the Arctic.

Videos range from 1:52 min to 7:19 min.

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Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Reducing human vulnerability to the impacts of climate change depends not only upon our ability to understand climate science, but also upon our ability to integrate that knowledge into human society. Decisions that involve Earth’s climate must be made with an understanding of the complex inter-connections among the physical and biological components of the Earth system as well as the consequences of such decisions on social, economic, and cultural systems.
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The impacts of climate change may affect the security of nations. Reduced availability of water, food, and land can lead to competition and conflict among humans, potentially resulting in large groups of climate refugees.
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Humans can adapt to climate change by reducing their vulnerability to its impacts. Actions such as moving to higher ground to avoid rising sea levels, planting new crops that will thrive under new climate conditions, or using new building technologies represent adaptation strategies. Adaptation often requires financial investment in new or enhanced research, technology, and infrastructure.
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mate is regulated by complex interactions among components of the Earth system
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Individual organisms survive within specific ranges of temperature, precipitation, humidity, and sunlight. Organisms exposed to climate conditions outside their normal range must adapt or migrate, or they will perish.
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Environmental observations are the foundation for understanding the climate system. From the bottom of the ocean to the surface of the Sun, instruments on weather stations, buoys, satellites, and other platforms collect climate data. To learn about past climates, scientists use natural records, such as tree rings, ice cores, and sedimentary layers. Historical observations, such as native knowledge and personal journals, also document past climate change.
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understanding of the climate system is improved through observations, theoretical studies, and modeling
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The overwhelming consensus of scientific studies on climate indicates that most of the observed increase in global average temperatures since the latter part of the 20th century is very likely due to human activities, primarily from increases in greenhouse gas concentrations resulting from the burning of fossil fuels.
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Scientists and economists predict that there will be both positive and negative impacts from global climate change. If warming exceeds 2 to 3°C (3.6 to 5.4°F) over the next century, the consequences of the negative impacts are likely to be much greater than the consequences of the positive impacts.
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man activities are impacting the climate system
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Ecosystems on land and in the ocean have been and will continue to be disturbed by climate change. Animals, plants, bacteria, and viruses will migrate to new areas with favorable climate conditions. Infectious diseases and certain species will be able to invade areas that they did not previously inhabit.
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mate change will have consequences for the Earth system and human lives
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Energy Literacy

Some populations are more vulnerable to impacts of energy choices than others.
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7.6 Vulnerable populations.
The quality of life of individuals and societies is affected by energy choices.
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Energy affects quality of life .
Humans transfer and transform energy from the environment into forms useful for human endeavors.
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4.1 Humans transfer and transform energy.
Fossil and bio fuels are organic matter that contain energy captured from sunlight.
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4.3 Fossil and bio fuels contain energy captured from sunlight.
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Various sources of energy are used to power human activities .
Human demand for energy is increasing.
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6.3 Demand for energy is increasing.
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Human use of energy.
Earth's weather and climate is mostly driven by energy from the Sun.
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2.3 Earth's climate driven by the Sun.
Greenhouse gases affect energy flow through the Earth system.
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2.6 Greenhouse gases affect energy flow.
The effects of changes in Earth's energy system are often not immediately apparent.
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2.7 Effects of changes in Earth's energy system .

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Educators can use these videos to discuss how climate change is currently affecting the Arctic and the possible future impacts on the social and economic life of its residents.
  • There are three background articles - "No Escape: Thaw Gains Momentum", "Old Ways of Life Are Fading as the Arctic Thaws" and "As Polar Ice Turns to Water, Dreams of Treasure Abound"- at http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/science/series/thebigmelt/index.html
  • These articles along with the accompanying five videos provide a good opportunity for group work. Groups could be assigned an article and video to analyze and report out to the class.

About the Science

  • These personal reflections will give some insight into current changes likely due to climate change but they largely do not reflect systematic study.
  • Comment from expert scientist: Overall, nice review of warming-induced melting of sea ice and melting Greenland ice cap. Does discuss some model accurate model projections of sea ice loss.

About the Pedagogy

  • This resource includes three articles on changes in the Arctic five videos and several graphics.
  • There are no teaching guides provided with these materials.
  • Videos are very good for introduction or integration of topics that weave in other topics that are not covered in the lesson. They are not designed as instructional videos.

Technical Details/Ease of Use


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