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Oceanic Food Web
https://public.ornl.gov/site/gallery/detail.cfm?id=326&topic=51&citation=&general=&restsection=public

Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Information System (BERIS)

This visualization illustrates the carbon cycle throughout the oceanic zones, beginning at the surface and traveling to the deep. The concept map-like connections encourage students to link the abiotic and biotic interactions within the oceanic food web.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Static Visualization supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
High School: 6 Disciplinary Core Ideas, 2 Cross Cutting Concepts

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Image could be used to help high school or undergraduate students make more complex connections in understanding pelagic marine food webs. A single organism could be highlighted and the path of energy traced throughout its interactions. Food web could be viewed in terms of oceanic levels, and students could compare interactions based on depth.
  • Can use as pre- and post- test with questions.

About the Science

  • Carbon flow and carbon fate in the ocean biological and physical pump.
  • Comment from expert scientist: Overall, this is a good review of the oceanic food web. The figure is interesting.

About the Pedagogy

  • The dynamic interactions of a marine pelagic food web are always challenging to document. This visualization does a good job at introducing some of the major players in a food web and initiating the connections for students. The additional text explaining the carbon flow and the references provided give educators the background needed to clarify misconceptions.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • Image can be viewed at full size or medium resolutions.

Next Generation Science Standards See how this Static Visualization supports:

High School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 6

HS-ESS2.D1:The foundation for Earth’s global climate systems is the electromagnetic radiation from the sun, as well as its reflection, absorption, storage, and redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and land systems, and this energy’s re-radiation into space.

HS-ESS2.D2:Gradual atmospheric changes were due to plants and other organisms that captured carbon dioxide and released oxygen.

HS-ESS2.D3:Changes in the atmosphere due to human activity have increased carbon dioxide concentrations and thus affect climate.

HS-ESS2.E1:The many dynamic and delicate feedbacks between the biosphere and other Earth systems cause a continual co-evolution of Earth’s surface and the life that exists on it.

HS-LS2.B3:Photosynthesis and cellular respiration are important components of the carbon cycle, in which carbon is exchanged among the biosphere, atmosphere, oceans, and geosphere through chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes.

HS-PS3.D2:The main way that solar energy is captured and stored on Earth is through the complex chemical process known as photosynthesis.

Cross Cutting Concepts: 2

Systems and System Models

HS-C4.3:Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.

HS-C4.4:Models can be used to predict the behavior of a system, but these predictions have limited precision and reliability due to the assumptions and approximations inherent in models.


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