Jump to this Activity »
Have the Talk: Climate Conversations
https://ourclimateourfuture.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Have-the-Talk-Lesson-Plan.pdf

Our Climate Our Future, ACE

In this learning activity students learn how to and practice having conversations about climate change with adults or peers. The activity is based on psychological and social science research.

This learning activity takes one 45 min class period.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Activity supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
High School: 2 Disciplinary Core Ideas, 2 Science and Engineering Practices

Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Reducing human vulnerability to and impacts on climate requires multi-disciplinary, integrated understanding
About Teaching the Guiding Principle
Other materials addressing GPb
Actions taken by different levels of society can mitigate climate change and increase preparedness for current and future generations
About Teaching the Guiding Principle
Other materials addressing GPg
Humans can take action
About Teaching Climate Literacy
Other materials addressing Humans can take action

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • This exercise would be best as a capstone activity. Both students and teachers need to be thoughtful in how they approach this experience.
  • The homework asks the child to have the conversation with a parent or family member. This could pit the child against the adult which could be an awkward situation for the child to be in, depending on the beliefs of the adult. To avoid this possible scenario, maybe have the student converse with a peer or someone in a lower grade. This would be a great way to conduct a “peer mentoring or collaboration” event.
  • Educators should keep in mind that having these conversations is difficult, even for professional scientists with communication training. Preparation will help to mitigate these challenges.
  • Educators may want to help students anticipate technical aspects of climate change that may come up in the conversation beforehand - see URLs below for help with this.

About the Science

  • This activity does not introduce new science concepts, rather, it invites students to talk about the science of climate change with other people. There is a planning worksheet that students can use to organize the points that are most important to them. Before students engage in conversation with others, it would be helpful to help them check that they have their facts correct.
  • One concern with this activity is that students could unwittingly get into highly technical or detailed aspects of climate change, if that's where their conversation partner leads them. Educators can help students anticipate possible directions for the conversation beforehand - see URLs below for more resources to help with this.
  • Comments from expert scientist:
    Scientific strengths:
    - Explains the psychology behind having an authentic and effective climate conversation
    Suggestions:
    - There really isn't any science other than the psychology of having a conversation in this resource. I suggest that this resource accompany another climate change resource to assist with the main points of the conversation.

About the Pedagogy

  • This learning activity teaches students a method for having conversations, and is grounded in social science. The method is broken down into parts (Open, Ask, Reflect, Reflect, Tell, Close) and is designed to minimize conflict and confrontation. Students learn about the psychology of having authentic and effective conversations about climate change with their family and friends. A large emphasis is placed on listening.
  • The activity is highly scaffolded, with role-play, a video, and a worksheet to think through the different parts of the conversation beforehand.
  • This resource educates and empowers young people and other underserved groups, to build skills in communicating about climate change. This is a helpful resource that encourages students to gain perspective and experience in having meaningful conversations about climate change.
  • Students need careful guidance in how to select an appropriate person to have this conversation with. They may want to start with a peer, not necessarily an adult.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • The lesson is well-supported with a video, PowerPoint slides, worksheets, and even a text message hotline for support. All resources are provided in the lesson plan.

Related URLs These related sites were noted by our reviewers but have not been reviewed by CLEAN

Next Generation Science Standards See how this Activity supports:

High School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 2

HS-ESS2.D3:Changes in the atmosphere due to human activity have increased carbon dioxide concentrations and thus affect climate.

HS-ESS2.D4:Current models predict that, although future regional climate changes will be complex and varied, average global temperatures will continue to rise. The outcomes predicted by global climate models strongly depend on the amounts of human-generated greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere each year and by the ways in which these gases are absorbed by the ocean and biosphere.

Science and Engineering Practices: 2

Engaging in Argument from Evidence

HS-P7.3:Respectfully provide and/or receive critiques on scientific arguments by probing reasoning and evidence, challenging ideas and conclusions, responding thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, and determining additional information required to resolve contradictions.

HS-P7.4:Construct, use, and/or present an oral and written argument or counter-arguments based on data and evidence.


Jump to this Activity »