Jump to this Video »
Striking a Solar Balance
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pz0JBSKRhf0

NASA, nasa.gov/multimedia

This NASA video reviews the role of the sun in driving the climate system. It uses colorful animations to illustrate Earth's energy balance and how increased greenhouse gases are creating an imbalance in the energy budget, leading to warming. The video also reviews how the NASA satellite program collects data on the sun.

Video length 3:35 min.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Video supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
High School: 9 Disciplinary Core Ideas

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Can be embedded into units dealing with the greenhouse effect and Earth's energy budget.
  • Nice intro to a module on the energy budget and why the sun is important in the climate system.
  • The related URL (http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/solar_variability.html) provides helpful background info for the instructor and/or students to put the video in better context.

About the Science

  • Earth's radiation budget and use of satellites to measure solar energy is discussed.
  • Passed initial science review - expert science review pending.

About the Pedagogy

  • Colorful animations appeal to visual learners.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • Very easy to use.

Related URLs These related sites were noted by our reviewers but have not been reviewed by CLEAN

NASA Mission News article "Solar Variability: Striking a Balance with Climate Change" - http://www.nasa.gov/topics/solarsystem/features/solar_variability.html

Next Generation Science Standards See how this Video supports:

High School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 9

HS-ESS1.B2:Cyclical changes in the shape of Earth’s orbit around the sun, together with changes in the tilt of the planet’s axis of rotation, both occurring over hundreds of thousands of years, have altered the intensity and distribution of sunlight falling on the earth. These phenomena cause a cycle of ice ages and other gradual climate changes.

HS-ESS2.A1:Earth’s systems, being dynamic and interacting, cause feedback effects that can increase or decrease the original changes.

HS-ESS2.D1:The foundation for Earth’s global climate systems is the electromagnetic radiation from the sun, as well as its reflection, absorption, storage, and redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and land systems, and this energy’s re-radiation into space.

HS-ESS2.D3:Changes in the atmosphere due to human activity have increased carbon dioxide concentrations and thus affect climate.

HS-ESS3.D1:Though the magnitudes of human impacts are greater than they have ever been, so too are human abilities to model, predict, and manage current and future impacts.

HS-PS3.A1:Energy is a quantitative property of a system that depends on the motion and interactions of matter and radiation within that system. That there is a single quantity called energy is due to the fact that a system’s total energy is conserved, even as, within the system, energy is continually transferred from one object to another and between its various possible forms.

HS-PS3.A2:At the macroscopic scale, energy manifests itself in multiple ways, such as in motion, sound, light, and thermal energy.

HS-PS3.D1:Although energy cannot be destroyed, it can be converted to less useful forms—for example, to thermal energy in the surrounding environment.

HS-PS3.D2:The main way that solar energy is captured and stored on Earth is through the complex chemical process known as photosynthesis.


Jump to this Video »