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Extreme Weather on Earth
http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/activity/extreme-weather-on-earth/?ar_a=1

Anna Mika, National Geographic Education

In this activity, students use a set of photographs and a 3-minute video on weather to investigate extreme weather events. They are posed with a series of questions that ask them to identify conditions predictive of these events, and record them on a worksheet. Climate and weather concepts are defined.

Video length: 3 minutes.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Activity supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
Middle School: 1 Disciplinary Core Idea, 4 Cross Cutting Concepts, 2 Science and Engineering Practices

Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

World's climate definition
About Teaching Principle 2
Other materials addressing 2a
Climate is not the same thing as weather – defining difference
About Teaching Principle 4
Other materials addressing 4b
Changes in climate is normal but varies over times/ space
About Teaching Principle 4
Other materials addressing 4d

Excellence in Environmental Education Guidelines

2. Knowledge of Environmental Processes and Systems:2.1 The Earth as a Physical System:A) Processes that shape the Earth
Other materials addressing:
A) Processes that shape the Earth.

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Educators are encouraged to start the activity by activating students' prior knowledge about extreme weather on Earth.
  • As an extension to this activity, educator could encourage students to investigate what constitutes extreme weather. In some areas, certain weather-related events may not be classified as extreme.

About the Science

  • Students investigate types of extreme weather and their contributing factors, and then explore similarities and differences between weather and climate.
  • Comment from expert scientist: Good overview and use of imagery. Language is appropriate.

About the Pedagogy

  • Video and brilliant photography archived on the National Geographic Society's website make this lesson stimulating; otherwise, it is a standard paper-and-pencil activity.
  • Text is provided underneath photographs, explaining the images.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

Next Generation Science Standards See how this Activity supports:

Middle School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 1

MS-ESS2.D1:Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography, all of which can affect oceanic and atmospheric flow patterns.

Cross Cutting Concepts: 4

Energy and Matter, Stability and Change, Patterns, Cause and effect

MS-C5.2: Within a natural or designed system, the transfer of energy drives the motion and/or cycling of matter.

MS-C7.1: Explanations of stability and change in natural or designed systems can be constructed by examining the changes over time and forces at different scales, including the atomic scale.

MS-C1.4:Graphs, charts, and images can be used to identify patterns in data.

MS-C2.2:Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems.

Science and Engineering Practices: 2

Analyzing and Interpreting Data, Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions

MS-P4.3: Distinguish between causal and correlational relationships in data.

MS-P6.1:Construct an explanation that includes qualitative or quantitative relationships between variables that predict(s) and/or describe(s) phenomena.


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