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Climate Prediction Center
http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

National Weather Service, NOAA

This interactive National Weather Service interactive visualization includes outlook maps for 6-10 day, 8-14 day, 1 month, and 3 month temperature and precipitation patterns in the US, as well as a hazards outlook and drought information.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Simulation/Interactive supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
Middle School: 2 Performance Expectations, 2 Disciplinary Core Ideas, 1 Cross Cutting Concept, 5 Science and Engineering Practices
High School: 1 Disciplinary Core Idea, 2 Cross Cutting Concepts, 2 Science and Engineering Practices

Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Definition of climate and climatic regions
About Teaching Principle 4
Other materials addressing 4a
Climate is not the same thing as weather – defining difference
About Teaching Principle 4
Other materials addressing 4b
Observations, experiments, and theory are used to construct and refine computer models
About Teaching Principle 5
Other materials addressing 5c
Meteorology and climatology are related but different sciences, and their processes are modeled and forecast differently
About Teaching Principle 5
Other materials addressing 5d

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Educators will have to make the connection between weather patterns and climate change. The visualizations are for current weather trends. This makes it easy to relate these maps to current news reports.
  • If educators are teaching a unit on weather and climate, they could use this site to track changes and predictions in weather over the time of the unit.

About the Science

  • Comprehensive collection of current weather and long-term climate data.
  • NOAA/National Weather Service website includes additional webpages describing how these maps are produced.
  • Comments from expert scientist: The strengths are the detail and breadth of information and data. I was able to look at numerous metrics of climate and weather in the present, predictions for the future, and summaries, reports, and raw data from the past. Links provided to external sources of information (NIDIS, etc.) are very helpful and round out the content of the site itself.

About the Pedagogy

  • This collection of interactive visualizations is a great way to compare current weather trends to historic patterns.
  • The maps themselves should be easy for most high school students to understand; younger students will need guidance.
  • Links to pages that describe how to read the maps are provided.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • The various maps in this collection can be viewed online and opened and saved as image files on web browsers. The outlook maps can be viewed as lines-only or color-filled.
  • The graphic clarity could be improved.

Next Generation Science Standards See how this Simulation/Interactive supports:

Middle School

Performance Expectations: 2

MS-ESS2-5: Collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.

MS-ESS2-6: Develop and use a model to describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 2

MS-ESS2.D1:Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography, all of which can affect oceanic and atmospheric flow patterns.

MS-ESS2.D2:Because these patterns are so complex, weather can only be predicted probabilistically.

Cross Cutting Concepts: 1

Patterns

MS-C1.4:Graphs, charts, and images can be used to identify patterns in data.

Science and Engineering Practices: 5

Developing and Using Models, Analyzing and Interpreting Data

MS-P2.1:Evaluate limitations of a model for a proposed object or tool.

MS-P2.3:Use and/or develop a model of simple systems with uncertain and less predictable factors.

MS-P2.5:Develop and/or use a model to predict and/or describe phenomena.

MS-P4.1:Construct, analyze, and/or interpret graphical displays of data and/or large data sets to identify linear and nonlinear relationships.

MS-P4.2:Use graphical displays (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, and/or tables) of large data sets to identify temporal and spatial relationships.

High School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 1

HS-ESS2.D4:Current models predict that, although future regional climate changes will be complex and varied, average global temperatures will continue to rise. The outcomes predicted by global climate models strongly depend on the amounts of human-generated greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere each year and by the ways in which these gases are absorbed by the ocean and biosphere.

Cross Cutting Concepts: 2

Patterns, Systems and System Models

HS-C1.5:Empirical evidence is needed to identify patterns.

HS-C4.4:Models can be used to predict the behavior of a system, but these predictions have limited precision and reliability due to the assumptions and approximations inherent in models.

Science and Engineering Practices: 2

Developing and Using Models, Analyzing and Interpreting Data

HS-P2.3:Develop, revise, and/or use a model based on evidence to illustrate and/or predict the relationships between systems or between components of a system

HS-P4.1:Analyze data using tools, technologies, and/or models (e.g., computational, mathematical) in order to make valid and reliable scientific claims or determine an optimal design solution.


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