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NASA S'COOL Lesson: Cloud in a Bottle
https://scool.larc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/view_lessonplan.cgi?id=87

Carolyn Green, Preston Lewis, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Students participate in a demonstration to explore how clouds form and what conditions are necessary for cloud formation.

This demonstration takes one 50 minute class period. Additional materials are required.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Short Demonstration/Experiment supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
Middle School: 2 Disciplinary Core Ideas, 2 Science and Engineering Practices
High School: 2 Science and Engineering Practices

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • This activity includes teaching tips at the bottom of the webpage.
  • It is also a part of a larger series on clouds.
  • There is a connection to the citizen science project formerly called S'COOL but is now part of the NASA GLOBE Observer project.

About the Science

  • This experiment introduces the concept of how clouds form.
  • It uses the hands-on activity to demonstrate how water vapor and condensation nuclei both need to be present for cloud formation.
  • The experiment also has an extensional activity where temperature and pressure can be varied in order to see how those variables change the cloud formation process.
  • Passed initial science review - expert science review pending.

About the Pedagogy

  • This resource is a hands-on experiment that demonstrates how clouds form.
  • During the experiment several assessment/discussion questions are provided in order to reiterate the scientific concepts. The questions lead to critical thinking about how clouds are formed.
  • There are several other links for the students to explore, as well as another experiment.
  • The combination of these materials should appeal to all learning types.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • Extra links are added for further investigation.
  • Some schools don't allow matches for the cloud in a bottle activity - alternatives like aerosol sprays can be used (a search will provide ideas for alternatives).

Related URLs These related sites were noted by our reviewers but have not been reviewed by CLEAN

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Next Generation Science Standards See how this Short Demonstration/Experiment supports:


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