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Graphing Ocean Acidification
http://www.explainingclimatechange.ca/Climate%20Change/swf/pHKeelingCurveGrapher/pHKeelingCurveGrapher.swf

King's Center for Visualization in Science

This applet is an ocean acidification grapher that allows user to plot changes in atmospheric C02 against ocean pH, from 1988 to 2009, in the central North Pacific.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Observations are the foundation for understanding the climate system
About Teaching Principle 5
Other materials addressing 5b
Increased acidity of oceans and negative impacts on food chain due to increasing carbon dioxide levels
About Teaching Principle 7
Other materials addressing 7d

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Excellent ocean acidification graphing tool to use in an oceanography/marine biology class. Requires additional information about context, relevance to climate change, and interpretation of data.
  • Viewing the visualization in its lesson context http://www.explainingclimatechange.ca/Climate%20Change/Lessons/Lesson%208/lesson8.html would be useful to the educator before using the tool with students.
  • The app might best be used in the context of additional information and interpretation.

About the Science

  • Visualization is a graphing tool for plotting changes in atmospheric C02 against pH from 1988 to 2009. Data used is adapted from published data, but how it is adapted is not specified.
  • Passed initial science review - expert science review pending.

About the Pedagogy

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • Easy to click the buttons to plot the data and draw a trend line.

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