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Change at the Top of the World
http://explore.org/#!/videos/player/change-at-the-top-of-the-world

Charles Annenberg Weingarten, Tom Pollock, Roger Jackson, Liz Marks, explore.org

This beautifully filmed and produced video describes the changes that global warming is already bringing to Northern Canada and Greenland. Local people describe changes to ecosystems, impacts on culture and life styles, and the challenges of melting permafrost. Ship captains describe changes in navigational channels and fjords. Scientists describe changes in albedo and permafrost, as well as increased pollution transported from outside the Arctic (the Grasshopper effect).

Video length is 24:06 min.

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Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Natural processes driving Earth’s long-term climate variability do not explain the rapid climate change observed in recent decades. The only explanation that is consistent with all available evidence is that human impacts are playing an increasing role in climate change. Future changes in climate may be rapid compared to historical changes.
About Teaching Principle 4
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Human activities have affected the land, oceans, and atmosphere, and these changes have altered global climate patterns. Burning fossil fuels, releasing chemicals into the atmosphere, reducing the amount of forest cover, and rapid expansion of farming, development, and industrial activities are releasing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and changing the balance of the climate system.
About Teaching Principle 6
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Growing evidence shows that changes in many physical and biological systems are linked to human-caused global warming. Some changes resulting from human activities have decreased the capacity of the environment to support various species and have substantially reduced ecosystem biodiversity and ecological resilience.
About Teaching Principle 6
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Human health and mortality rates will be affected to different degrees in specific regions of the world as a result of climate change. Although cold-related deaths are predicted to decrease, other risks are predicted to rise. The incidence and geographical range of climate-sensitive infectious diseases—such as malaria, dengue fever, and tick-borne diseases—will increase. Drought-reduced crop yields, degraded air and water quality, and increased hazards in coastal and low-lying areas will contribute to unhealthy conditions, particularly for the most vulnerable populations.
About Teaching Principle 7
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Benchmarks for Science Literacy
Learn more about the Benchmarks

The earth's climates have changed in the past, are currently changing, and are expected to change in the future, primarily due to changes in the amount of light reaching places on the earth and the composition of the atmosphere. The burning of fossil fuels in the last century has increased the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which has contributed to Earth's warming.
Explore the map of concepts related to this benchmark
By burning fuels, people are releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and transforming chemical energy into thermal energy which spreads throughout the environment.
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Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • While this is a long video (>24 minutes), educators will find it useful in conveying the human dimensions of climate change.
  • Teachers could break the video into chunks and conduct class discussions.

About the Science

  • Both anecdotal and expert evidence is given.
  • Comments from expert scientist: The video beautifully reveals some startling facts of rapidly changing climatic conditions of the Arctic and its direct effect on the local human population, the Inuits of the Canadian Arctic and Greenland. The presence of inhabitants and the large watermass (Arctic Ocean) at the north polar region and makes the place even more sensitive to climate change as compared to its southern counterpart the Antarctica.

About the Pedagogy

  • This video is unique in that it uses an interdisciplinary approach to describe how climate change is impacting oceans, land, ecosystems, and cultures. Scientists and native people's perspectives are presented in a seamless manner.
  • There are discussion questions, and background material are at http://files.explore.org/files/explore-LP_Arctic-Science_.pdf. There are also some background links on the webpage with the video.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • This is both a beautiful and disturbing video. It uses maps effectively to show where the host and speakers are.
  • Requires a login to download video.
  • The audio was somewhat quiet in places.

Related URLs These related sites were noted by our reviewers but have not been reviewed by CLEAN

http://files.explore.org/files/explore-LP_Arctic-Science_.pdf

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