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State of the Climate 2009
http://www.climatewatch.noaa.gov/video/2010/soc2009

StormCenter Communications, NOAA, NOAA

This short video clip summarizes NOAA's annual State of the Climate Report for 2009. It presents a comprehensive summary of Earth’s climate in 2009 and establishes the last decade as the warmest on record. Reduced extent of Arctic sea ice, glacier volume, and snow cover reflect the effects of rising global temperature.

Video length: 1:54 min.

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Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

mate is regulated by complex interactions among components of the Earth system
About Teaching Principle C
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Climate is not the same thing as weather. Weather is the minute-by-minute variable condition of the atmosphere on a local scale. Climate is a conceptual description of an area’s average weather conditions and the extent to which those conditions vary over long time intervals.
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Climate change is a significant and persistent change in an area’s average climate conditions or their extremes. Seasonal variations and multi-year cycles (for example, the El Niño Southern Oscillation) that produce warm, cool, wet, or dry periods across different regions are a natural part of climate variability. They do not represent climate change.
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Scientific observations indicate that global climate has changed in the past, is changing now, and will change in the future. The magnitude and direction of this change is not the same at all locations on Earth.
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Based on evidence from tree rings, other natural records, and scientific observations made around the world, Earth’s average temperature is now warmer than it has been for at least the past 1,300 years. Average temperatures have increased markedly in the past 50 years, especially in the North Polar Region.
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mate varies over space and time through both natural and man-made processes
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Environmental observations are the foundation for understanding the climate system. From the bottom of the ocean to the surface of the Sun, instruments on weather stations, buoys, satellites, and other platforms collect climate data. To learn about past climates, scientists use natural records, such as tree rings, ice cores, and sedimentary layers. Historical observations, such as native knowledge and personal journals, also document past climate change.
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mate change will have consequences for the Earth system and human lives
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Benchmarks for Science Literacy
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The earth's climates have changed in the past, are currently changing, and are expected to change in the future, primarily due to changes in the amount of light reaching places on the earth and the composition of the atmosphere. The burning of fossil fuels in the last century has increased the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, which has contributed to Earth's warming.
Explore the map of concepts related to this benchmark

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Might be a good short summary/video introduction to what scientists observed in 2009 as predictions of climate in the coming decade. NOAA has just released its report for 2011, which could be used in conjunction with this video
  • Replace with 2011 report video when available.
  • Could use as a quick introduction to climate change in middle school.

About the Science

  • The report the video describes presents a very general summary of Earth's climate in 2009 and establishes the last decade as the warmest on record.
  • Discusses how reduced extent of Arctic sea ice, glacier volume, and snow cover reflect the effects of rising global temperature.
  • Report is dated. There is a 2011 report available via a link.
  • Comments from expert scientist: The video talks about the document published by NOAA reporting the state of the climate in 2009. It explains in a simple way some important conclusions that scientists obtained analyzing the climate conditions of the last decades. The video was built on a solid scientific basis and is a reliable source of information.

About the Pedagogy

  • Transcript is provided. There are links to the full and more recent reports.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • Download or view online
  • High-quality resolution

Related URLs These related sites were noted by our reviewers but have not been reviewed by CLEAN

http://www.climate.gov/#climateWatch

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