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The impact of a global temperature rise of 2C
http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/media/pdf/s/e/2degrees-map.pdf

UK Met Service

This poster, viewable online, highlights some of the impacts of a global-average temperature rise of 2 degrees C above the pre-industrial age climate.

Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

ngssSee how this Static Visualization supports the Next Generation Science Standards»
Middle School: 2 Disciplinary Core Ideas, 4 Cross Cutting Concepts
High School: 2 Disciplinary Core Ideas, 3 Cross Cutting Concepts

Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Sea level rise and resulting impacts is due to melting ice and thermal expansion and increases the risk
About Teaching Principle 7
Other materials addressing 7a
Effects of climate change on water cycle and freshwater availability
About Teaching Principle 7
Other materials addressing 7b
Increased extreme weather events due to climate change
About Teaching Principle 7
Other materials addressing 7c
Ecosystems on land and in the ocean have been and will continue to be disturbed by climate change
About Teaching Principle 7
Other materials addressing 7e

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Educators could seed a discussion of this map with questions about why certain impacts are projected for different regions.
  • Important caveat at the bottom of the page notes that adaptive capacity not taken into consideration.
  • Given that 2 degrees C is now a likely minimum of change, what can be done to adapt human systems to the change, and how will ecosystems on which we depend adapt?

About the Science

  • This visualization shows some of the major global impacts from a global mean temperature rise of 2 degrees Celsius.
  • It was produced by the UK Met Office - Hadley Centre.
  • Passed initial science review - expert science review pending.

About the Pedagogy

  • The map is information-rich.
  • It encourages students to explore how a number of different impacts are connected to temperature rise and to each other, and how these impacts differ around the globe.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

Next Generation Science Standards See how this Static Visualization supports:

Middle School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 2

MS-ESS3.D1:Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities.

MS-ESS3.D:

Cross Cutting Concepts: 4

Systems and System Models, Patterns, Cause and effect

MS-C4.2: Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions—such as inputs, processes and outputs—and energy, matter, and information flows within systems.

MS-C1.4:Graphs, charts, and images can be used to identify patterns in data.

MS-C2.1:Relationships can be classified as causal or correlational, and correlation does not necessarily imply causation.

MS-C2.2:Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems.

High School

Disciplinary Core Ideas: 2

HS-ESS2.D4:Current models predict that, although future regional climate changes will be complex and varied, average global temperatures will continue to rise. The outcomes predicted by global climate models strongly depend on the amounts of human-generated greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere each year and by the ways in which these gases are absorbed by the ocean and biosphere.

HS-ESS3.D1:Though the magnitudes of human impacts are greater than they have ever been, so too are human abilities to model, predict, and manage current and future impacts.

Cross Cutting Concepts: 3

Patterns, Cause and effect, Systems and System Models

HS-C1.5:Empirical evidence is needed to identify patterns.

HS-C2.1:Empirical evidence is required to differentiate between cause and correlation and make claims about specific causes and effects.

HS-C4.3:Models (e.g., physical, mathematical, computer models) can be used to simulate systems and interactions—including energy, matter, and information flows—within and between systems at different scales.


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