Jump to this Simulation/Interactive »
The Global Carbon Budget 1960 - 2100

Galen McKinley, University of Wisconsin - Madison

This simulation allows the user to project CO2 sources and sinks by adjusting the points on a graph and then running the simulation to see projections for the impact on atmospheric CO2 and global temperatures.

Discuss this Resource»
Learn more about Teaching Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness»

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Direct students to watch each projection at least twice: Once while focusing on the graph being produced, and then again to watch changes in the graphic at the bottom of the page.

About the Science

  • An interactive way to look at the global carbon cycle and its relationship with global warming.
  • The estimated global temperature response is a rough scaling based upon average IPCC AR4 (2007) model sensitivity to atmospheric CO2.
  • Students can adjust CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and land use (sources) and uptake from oceans and land (sinks).
  • Comments from expert scientist: A one-of-a-kind resource that I use frequently in graduate and undergrad teaching, teacher training, and K-gray outreach. An essential tool for teaching climate science, climate policy, scenario development and integrated assessment.

About the Pedagogy

  • Excellent graphic that shows changes in the carbon cycle given different scenarios of fossil fuel use in the future.
  • Students use the interactive as a tool to predict what temperature conditions on Earth will be given different levels of carbon injected into the atmosphere.
  • Shows the complexities of climate change and the usefulness and limitations of modeling.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • The teacher may need to explain to students that they must select a button under sources or sinks before they can manipulate the graph on the left.
  • Good introductory material on home page http://carboncycle.aos.wisc.edu/. Easy to use and analyze the results.

Jump to this Simulation/Interactive »

Have you used these materials with your students? Do you have insights to share with other educators about their use? Please share with the community by adding a comment below.

Please use this space only for discussion about teaching with these particular materials.
For more general discussion about teaching climate literacy please use our general discussion boards.
To report a problem or direct a comment to the CLEAN project team please use our feedback form (or the feedback link at the bottom of every page).
Off-topic posts will be deleted.

Join the Discussion

Log in to reply