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Climate and Weather
http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/science/earth-sci/climate-weather-sci.html

National Geographic

This video discusses the differences between climate and weather by defining and presenting examples of each. When presenting examples of weather, the video focuses on severe events and how meteorologists predict and study the weather using measurement, satellites, and radar. The climate focus is primarily on an overview of climate zones.

Video length: 3:22 min.

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Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Earth’s climate is influenced by interactions involving the Sun, ocean, atmosphere, clouds, ice, land, and life. Climate varies by region as a result of local differences in these interactions.
About Teaching Principle 2
Other materials addressing 2a
Climate is not the same thing as weather. Weather is the minute-by-minute variable condition of the atmosphere on a local scale. Climate is a conceptual description of an area’s average weather conditions and the extent to which those conditions vary over long time intervals.
About Teaching Principle 4
Other materials addressing 4b
mate varies over space and time through both natural and man-made processes
About Teaching Principle C
Other materials addressing Cli

Benchmarks for Science Literacy
Learn more about the Benchmarks

The earth has a variety of climates, defined by average temperature, precipitation, humidity, air pressure, and wind, over time in a particular place.
Explore the map of concepts related to this benchmark
Climatic conditions result from latitude, altitude, and from the position of mountain ranges, oceans, and lakes. Dynamic processes such as cloud formation, ocean currents, and atmospheric circulation patterns influence climates as well.
Explore the map of concepts related to this benchmark
The weather is always changing and can be described by measurable quantities such as temperature, wind direction and speed, and precipitation. Large masses of air with certain properties move across the surface of the earth. The movement and interaction of these air masses is used to forecast the weather.
Explore the map of concepts related to this benchmark

Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • This contains very basic information. It could be a good introduction for middle school students or a good refresher for 9th graders who need clarification on the definitions of weather and climate.

About the Science

  • While weather and climate are connected, they are driven by different processes and are studied using different strategies.
  • Climate is the average weather conditions over a long period of time. There are six major climate zones across the globe. Climate is a factor that helps people determine where to live.
  • Weather is the day-to-day conditions of the conditions of Earth's atmosphere. Severe weather events cause billions of dollars in damages to infrastructure. Weather forecasts allow humans to prepare for severe weather events.
  • Meteorologists and scientists use advanced tools to research the atmosphere. These tools include computer models, radar, and satellites.
  • Comments from expert scientist: Clear articulation of the difference between climate and weather.
  • The point is well made that Earth has different climate zones but within each zone the conditions are highly variable.

About the Pedagogy

  • This is a good video to show when teaching about the differences between weather and climate.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • The video quality seems pixelated and is made worse when played full screen.
  • The video can be shared or embedded. There is a short, 15-second advertisement at the beginning of video.

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