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Alaska: AK-01 Columbia Glacier Kadin (Narrated)
http://extremeicesurvey.org/

Extreme Ice Survey

This short, time-lapse video shows the changes in the Columbia Glacier from May 12, 2007 to August 20, 2010. Narration provides general description of the geophysical dynamics and processes.

Video length: 0:51 min.

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Climate Literacy
About Teaching Climate Literacy

Environmental observations are the foundation for understanding the climate system. From the bottom of the ocean to the surface of the Sun, instruments on weather stations, buoys, satellites, and other platforms collect climate data. To learn about past climates, scientists use natural records, such as tree rings, ice cores, and sedimentary layers. Historical observations, such as native knowledge and personal journals, also document past climate change.
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Scientific investigations usually involve the collection of relevant data, the use of logical reasoning, and the application of imagination in devising hypotheses and explanations to make sense of the collected data.
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Notes From Our Reviewers The CLEAN collection is hand-picked and rigorously reviewed for scientific accuracy and classroom effectiveness. Read what our review team had to say about this resource below or learn more about how CLEAN reviews teaching materials
Teaching Tips | Science | Pedagogy | Technical Details

Teaching Tips

  • Should be used with other related videos and background materials on the Extreme Ice Survey website.
  • This short clip can be shown in conjunction with any discussion on the impacts of global warming. There will be a need to describe how the motion of glaciers today are different from the motions in the past (use Google Scholar and search on "climate change" glaciers).
  • Many more of this type of video can be found at: http://www.extremeicesurvey.org/index.php/new_gallery/

About the Science

  • Dr. Tad Pfeffer of INSTAAR describes recent changes in the Columbia Glacier in Alaska.
  • During most of the two-year span of the video, the ice is moving at a pretty good clip of about 50 to 80 feet (15 to 24 meters) a day.
  • The cracks and fissures running sideways across the glacier are crevasses formed when the ice stretches and breaks in its effort to keep up with the accelerating downward pace.
  • Transverse crevasses are an indicator of ice being stretched along the flow direction.
  • The dark, curvy stripes that run along the sides of the glacier are medial moraines—channels of debris left behind where branch glaciers joined the main glacier in its flow.
  • Passed initial science review - expert science review pending.

About the Pedagogy

  • One of several complementary time-lapse videos of the Columbia glacier and other Arctic glaciers.

Technical Details/Ease of Use

  • A short written explanation of the clip is given.

Related URLs These related sites were noted by our reviewers but have not been reviewed by CLEAN

Parent URL: http://www.extremeicesurvey.org/index.php/new_gallery/

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