CLEAN > Climate and Energy Educational Resources > NGSS Middle School Climate Systems
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Teaching Climate Systems:
Middle School Resources Organized by Key NGSS Standards

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Performance Expectations ? About  

The NGSS Performance Expectations are statements that explain what all students should know and be able to do after instruction. These comprehensive statements should not limit teaching and learning. Performance Expectations are best addressed in instruction when resources are bundled together to address big ideas in science. The CLEAN collection includes resources that do not fully address any one Performance Expectation. Bundling CLEAN resources will support instruction towards Performance Expectations. Most resources are tagged for DCIs, SEPs, and CCCs. Those tagged for Performance Expectations, fully address the PEs.

Describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation
MS-ESS2-6
Develop and use a model to describe how unequal heating and rotation of the Earth cause patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.
Construct an argument for how increases in human population impact Earth’s systems.
MS-ESS3-4
Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per-capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth's systems.
Describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among the parts of an ecosystem.
MS-LS2-3
Develop a model to describe the cycling of matter and flow of energy among living and nonliving parts of an ecosystem
Construct an argument that changes to components of an ecosystem affect populations.
MS-LS2-4
Construct an argument supported by empirical evidence that changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem affect populations.

Disciplinary Core Ideas

Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere.
MS-ESS2.C1
Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, and precipitation, as well as downhill flows on land.
Weather and climate are influenced by sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and geography.
MS-ESS2.D1
Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography, all of which can affect oceanic and atmospheric flow patterns.
The ocean exerts a major influence on weather and climate by absorbing energy from the sun, releasing it over time, and globally redistributing it through ocean currents.
MS-ESS2.D3
The ocean exerts a major influence on weather and climate by absorbing energy from the sun, releasing it over time, and globally redistributing it through ocean currents.
Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature.
MS-ESS3.D1
Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities.

Science and Engineering Practices

Ask questions to help explain unexpected results, clarify, or seek additional information.
MS-P1.1
Ask questions that arise from careful observation of phenomena, models, or unexpected results, to clarify and/or seek additional information.
Construct, analyze, or interpret graphical displays of data or large data sets to identify relationships.
MS-P4.1
Construct, analyze, and/or interpret graphical displays of data and/or large data sets to identify linear and nonlinear relationships.
Use graphical displays of large data sets to identify temporal and spatial relationships.
MS-P4.2
Use graphical displays (e.g., maps, charts, graphs, and/or tables) of large data sets to identify temporal and spatial relationships.
Construct an explanation that includes qualitative or quantitative relationships between variables that predict or describe phenomena.
MS-P6.1
Construct an explanation that includes qualitative or quantitative relationships between variables that predict(s) and/or describe(s) phenomena.

Cross Cutting Concepts

Patterns in rates of change and other relationships can improve understanding of natural and human systems.
MS-C1.2
Patterns in rates of change and other numerical relationships can provide information about natural and human designed systems
Graphs, charts, and images can be used to identify patterns in data.
MS-C1.4
Graphs, charts, and images can be used to identify patterns in data.
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems.
MS-C2.2
Cause and effect relationships may be used to predict phenomena in natural or designed systems.
Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions—such as inputs, processes, flows, and outputs.
MS-C4.2
Models can be used to represent systems and their interactions—such as inputs, processes and outputs—and energy, matter, and information flows within systems.

Resource Type

Activity
Short Demonstration/Experiment
Visualization
Video