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NGSS and CLEAN at a Glance

Clicking the blue text below will display tables with the NGSS Performance Expectations (PE) and Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI) that address climate and energy topics. The tables include links to relevant CLEAN resources. Hovering on the green DCI concept bullet will display the full text.

Middle School

Middle School - Life Science in CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
MS-LS1:
From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS1.C:
Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS1.C: Plants, algae...Plants, algae (including phytoplankton), and many microorganisms use the energy from light to make sugars (food) from carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and water through the process of photosynthesis, which also releases oxygen. These sugars can be used immediately or stored for growth or later use.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2:
Ecosystems:
Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.A:
Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.A: Organisms, and populations...Organisms, and populations of organisms, are dependent on their environmental interactions both with other living things and with nonliving factors.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.A: In any ecosystem... In any ecosystem, organisms and populations with similar requirements for food, water, oxygen, or other resources may compete with each other for limited resources, access to which consequently constrains their growth and reproduction.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.A: Growth of organisms... Growth of organisms and population increases are limited by access to resources.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.A: Similarly, predatory interactions... Similarly, predatory interactions may reduce the number of organisms or eliminate whole populations of organisms. Mutually beneficial interactions, in contrast, may become so interdependent that each organism requires the other for survival. Although the species involved in these competitive, predatory, and mutually beneficial interactions vary across ecosystems, the patterns of interactions of organisms with their environments, both living and nonliving, are shared.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.B:
Cycle of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.B: Food webs are models...Food webs are models that demonstrate how matter and energy is transferred between producers, consumers, and decomposers as the three groups interact within an ecosystem. Transfers of matter into and out of the physical environment occur at every level. Decomposers recycle nutrients from dead plant or animal matter back to the soil in terrestrial environments or to the water in aquatic environments. The atoms that make up the organisms in an ecosystem are cycled repeatedly between the living and nonliving parts of the ecosystem.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS2.C:
Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS1.C: Ecosystems are dynamic...Ecosystems are dynamic in nature; their characteristics can vary over time. Disruptions to any physical or biological component of an ecosystem can lead to shifts in all its populations.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS1.C: Biodiversity describes the varietyBiodiversity describes the variety of species found in Earth's terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems. The completeness or integrity of an ecosystem's biodiversity is often used as a measure of its health
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4:
Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4.A:
Evidence of Common Ancestry and Diversity
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4.A: The collection of fossils...The collection of fossils and their placement in chronological order (e.g., through the location of the sedimentary layers in which they are found or through radioactive dating) is known as the fossil record. It documents the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of many life forms throughout the history of life on Earth.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4.C:
Adaptation
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4.C: Adaptation by natural selection...Adaptation by natural selection acting over generations is one important process by which species change over time in response to changes in environmental conditions. Traits that support successful survival and reproduction in the new environment become more common; those that do not become less common. Thus, the distribution of traits in a population changes.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4.D:
Biodiversity and Humans
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-LS4.D: Changes in biodiversity...Changes in biodiversity can influence humans resources, such as food, energy, and medicines, as well as ecosystem services that humans rely on for example, water purification and recycling.
(see CLEAN Resources)
Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.

Middle School - Physical Science in CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
MS-PS1:
Matter and its Interaction
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS1.A:
Structure and Properties of Matter
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS1.A: Gases and liquids...Gases and liquids are made of molecules or inert atoms that are moving about relative to each other.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS1.A: In a liquid...In a liquid, the molecules are constantly in contact with others; in a gas, they are widely spaced except when they happen to collide. In a solid, atoms are closely spaced and may vibrate in position but do not change relative locations.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS1.A: The changes of state...The changes of state that occur with variations in temperature or pressure can be described and predicted using these models of matter.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS1.B:
Chemical Reactions
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS1.B: Some chemical reactions...Some chemical reactions release energy, others store energy.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3:
Energy
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3.B:
Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3.B: The amount of energy...The amount of energy transfer needed to change the temperature of a matter sample by a given amount depends on the nature of the matter, the size of the sample, and the environment.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3.B: Energy is spontaneously...Energy is spontaneously transferred out of hotter regions or objects and into colder ones.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3.D:
Energy in Chemical Processes and Everyday Life
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3.D: The chemical reaction...The chemical reaction by which plants produce complex food molecules (sugars) requires an energy input (i.e., from sunlight) to occur. In this reaction, carbon dioxide and water combine to form carbon-based organic molecules and release oxygen.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS3.D: Cellular respiration...Cellular respiration in plants and animals involve chemical reactions with oxygen that release stored energy. In these processes, complex molecules containing carbon react with oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and other materials.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS4:
Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS4.B:
Electromagnetic Radiation
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-PS4.B: When light shines...When light shines on an object, it is reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through the object, depending on the object's material and the frequency (color) of the light.
(see CLEAN Resources)
Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.

Middle School - Earth and Space Sciencein CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
MS-ESS1:
Earth's Place in the Universe
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS1B:
Earth and the Solar System
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS1.B: This model of the solar system...This model of the solar system can explain eclipses of the sun and the moon. Earth's spin axis is fixed in direction over the short-term but tilted relative to its orbit around the sun. The seasons are a result of that tilt and are caused by the differential intensity of sunlight on different areas of Earth across the year.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS1.C:
The History of Planet Earth
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS1.C: The geologic time scale...The geologic time scale interpreted from rock strata provides a way to organize Earth's history. Analyses of rock strata and the fossil record provide only relative dates, not an absolute scale.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2:
Earth's Systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.A:
Earth's Materials and Systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.A: All Earth processes...All Earth processes are the result of energy flowing and matter cycling within and among the planet's systems. This energy is derived from the sun and Earth's hot interior. The energy that flows and matter that cycles produce chemical and physical changes in Earth's materials and living organisms.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.A: The planet's systems...The planet's systems interact over scales that range from microscopic to global in size, and they operate over fractions of a second to billions of years. These interactions have shaped Earth's history and will determine its future.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.C:
The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.C: Water continually cycles...Water continually cycles among land, ocean, and atmosphere via transpiration, evaporation, condensation and crystallization, and precipitation, as well as downhill flows on land.
(see CLEAN Resources]
MS-ESS2.C: The complex patterns...The complex patterns of the changes and the movement of water in the atmosphere, determined by winds, landforms, and ocean temperatures and currents, are major determinants of local weather patterns.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.C: Global movements of...Global movements of water and its changes in form are propelled by sunlight and gravity.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.C: Variations in density...Variations in density due to variations in temperature and salinity drive a global pattern of interconnected ocean currents.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.C: Water's movements both...Water's movements both on the land and underground cause weathering and erosion, which change the land's surface features and create underground formations.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.D:
Weather and Climate
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.D: Weather and climate are influenced...Weather and climate are influenced by interactions involving sunlight, the ocean, the atmosphere, ice, landforms, and living things. These interactions vary with latitude, altitude, and local and regional geography, all of which can affect oceanic and atmospheric flow patterns.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.D: Because these patterns...Because these patterns are so complex, weather can only be predicted probabilistically.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS2.D: The ocean exerts...The ocean exerts a major influence on weather and climate by absorbing energy from the sun, releasing it over time, and globally redistributing it through ocean currents.
(see CLEAN Resources
MS-ESS3:
Earth and Human Activity
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.A:
Natural Resources
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.A: Humans depend on...Humans depend on Earth's land, ocean, atmosphere, and biosphere for many different resources. Minerals, fresh water, and biosphere resources are limited, and many are not renewable or replaceable over human lifetimes. These resources are distributed unevenly around the planet as a result of past geologic processes.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.B:
Natural Hazards
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.B: Mapping the history...Mapping the history of natural hazards in a region, combined with an understanding of related geologic forces can help forecast the locations and likelihoods of future events.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.C:
Human Impacts on Earth Systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.C: Human activities have...Human activities have significantly altered the biosphere, sometimes damaging or destroying natural habitats and causing the extinction of other species. But changes to Earth's environments can have different impacts (negative and positive) for different living things.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.C: Typically as human...Typically as human populations and per-capita consumption of natural resources increase, so do the negative impacts on Earth unless the activities and technologies involved are engineered otherwise.
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.D:
Global Climate Change
(see CLEAN Resources)
MS-ESS3.D: Human activities such as...Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth's mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities.
(see CLEAN Resources)
Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.

High School

High School - Life Sciencein CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
HS-LS1:
From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS1.C:
Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS1.C: The process of photosynthesis...The process of photosynthesis converts light energy to stored chemical energy by converting carbon dioxide plus water into sugars plus released oxygen.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS1.C: The sugar molecules...The sugar molecules thus formed contain carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen: their hydrocarbon backbones are used to make amino acids and other carbon-based molecules that can be assembled into larger molecules (such as proteins or DNA), used for example to form new cells.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS1.C: As matter and energy...As matter and energy flow through different organizational levels of living systems, chemical elements are recombined in different ways to form different products.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS1.C: As a result of...As a result of these chemical reactions, energy is transferred from one system of interacting molecules to another. Cellular respiration is a chemical process in which the bonds of food molecules and oxygen molecules are broken and new compounds are formed that can transport energy to muscles. Cellular respiration also releases the energy needed to maintain body temperature despite ongoing energy transfer to the surrounding environment.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2:
Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.A:
Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.A: Ecosystems have carrying...Ecosystems have carrying capacities, which are limits to the numbers of organisms and populations they can support. These limits result from such factors as the availability of living and nonliving resources and from such challenges such as predation, competition, and disease. Organisms would have the capacity to produce populations of great size were it not for the fact that environments and resources are finite. This fundamental tension affects the abundance (number of individuals) of species in any given ecosystem.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.B:
Cycles of Matter and Energy Transfer in Ecosystems
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.B: Plants or algae form...Plants or algae form the lowest level of the food web. At each link upward in a food web, only a small fraction of the matter consumed at the lower level is transferred upward, to produce growth and release energy in cellular respiration at the higher level. Given this inefficiency, there are generally fewer organisms at higher levels of a food web. Some matter reacts to release energy for life functions, some matter is stored in newly made structures, and much is discarded. The chemical elements that make up the molecules of organisms pass through food webs and into and out of the atmosphere and soil, and they are combined and recombined in different ways. At each link in an ecosystem, matter and energy are conserved.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.B: Photosynthesis and cellular...Photosynthesis and cellular respiration are important components of the carbon cycle, in which carbon is exchanged among the biosphere, atmosphere, oceans, and geosphere through chemical, physical, geological, and biological processes.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.C:
Ecosystem Dynamics, Functioning, and Resilience
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS2.C: Moreover, anthropogenic changes...Moreover, anthropogenic changes (induced by human activity) in the environment including habitat destruction, pollution, introduction of invasive species, overexploitation, and climate change can disrupt an ecosystem and threaten the survival of some species.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4:
Biological Evolution: Unity and Diversity
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4.C:
Adaptation
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4.C: Changes in the physical environment...Changes in the physical environment, whether naturally occurring or human induced, have thus contributed to the expansion of some species, the emergence of new distinct species as populations diverge under different conditions, and the decline and sometimes the extinction of some species.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4.C: Species become extinct...Species become extinct because they can no longer survive and reproduce in their altered environment. If members cannot adjust to change that is too fast or drastic, the opportunity for the species evolution is lost.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4.D:
Biodiversity and Humans
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4.D: Humans depend on...Humans depend on the living world for the resources and other benefits provided by biodiversity. But human activity is also having adverse impacts on biodiversity through overpopulation, overexploitation, habitat destruction, pollution, introduction of invasive species, and climate change. Thus sustaining biodiversity so that ecosystem functioning and productivity are maintained is essential to supporting and enhancing life on Earth. Sustaining biodiversity also aids humanity by preserving landscapes of recreational or inspirational value.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-LS4.D: Biodiversity is increased...Biodiversity is increased by the formation of new species (speciation) and decreased by the loss of species (extinction).
(see CLEAN Resources)
Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.

High School - Physical Sciencein CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
HS-PS3:
Energy
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS3.A:
Definitions of Energy
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS3.A: At the macroscopic scale...At the macroscopic scale, energy manifests itself in multiple ways, such as in motion, sound, light, and thermal energy.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS3.A: These relationships are better...These relationships are better understood at the microscopic scale, at which all of the different manifestations of energy can be modeled as a combination of energy associated with the motion of particles and energy associated with the configuration (relative position of the particles). In some cases the relative position energy can be thought of as stored in fields (which mediate interactions between particles). This last concept includes radiation, a phenomenon in which energy stored in fields moves across space.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS3.A: Electrical energy may mean...Electrical energy may mean energy stored in a battery or energy transmitted by electric currents.
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.B:
Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.B: Conservation of energy...Conservation of energy means that the total change of energy in any system is always equal to the total energy transferred into or out of the system.
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.B: Energy cannot be created...Energy cannot be created or destroyed, but it can be transported from one place to another and transferred between systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.D:
Energy in Chemical Processes
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.D: Although energy cannot be...Although energy cannot be destroyed, it can be converted to less useful forms for example, to thermal energy in the surrounding environment.
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.D: The main way that solar...The main way that solar energy is captured and stored on Earth is through the complex chemical process known as photosynthesis.
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.D: Solar cells are human-made...Solar cells are human-made devices that likewise capture the sun's energy and produce electrical energy.
(see CLEAN Resources)
PS3.D: Nuclear Fusion processes...Nuclear Fusion processes in the center of the sun release the energy that ultimately reaches Earth as radiation.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS4:
Waves and their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS4.B:
Electromagnetic Radiation
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS4.B: When light or longer...When light or longer wavelength electromagnetic radiation is absorbed in matter, it is generally converted into thermal energy (heat). Shorter wavelength electromagnetic radiation (ultraviolet, X-rays, gamma rays) can ionize atoms and cause damage to living cells
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-PS4.B: Photoelectric materials emit...Photoelectric materials emit electrons when they absorb light of a high-enough frequency.
(see CLEAN Resources)
Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.

High School - Earth and Space Sciencein CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
HS-ESS1:
Earth's Place in the Universe
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS1.B:
Earth and the Solar System
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS1.B: Kepler's laws describe...Kepler's laws describe common features of the motions of orbiting objects, including their elliptical paths around the sun. Orbits may change due to the gravitational effects from, or collisions with, other objects in the solar system.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS1.B: Cyclical changes in the shape...Cyclical changes in the shape of Earth's orbit around the sun, together with changes in the tilt of the planet's axis of rotation, both occurring over hundreds of thousands of years, have altered the intensity and distribution of sunlight falling on the earth. These phenomena cause a cycle of ice ages and other gradual climate changes.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2:
Earth's Systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.A
Earth Materials and Systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.A: Earth's systems, being dynamic...Earth's systems, being dynamic and interacting, cause feedback effects that can increase or decrease the original changes.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.A: The geological record shows...The geological record shows that changes to global and regional climate can be caused by interactions among changes in the sun's energy output or Earth's orbit, tectonic events, ocean circulation, volcanic activity, glaciers, vegetation, and human activities. These changes can occur on a variety of time scales from sudden (e.g., volcanic ash clouds) to intermediate (ice ages) to very long-term tectonic cycles.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.C:
The Roles of Water in Earth's Surface Processes
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.C: The abundance of liquid water...The abundance of liquid water on Earth's surface and its unique combination of physical and chemical properties are central to the planet's dynamics. These properties include water's exceptional capacity to absorb, store, and release large amounts of energy, transmit sunlight, expand upon freezing, dissolve and transport materials, and lower the viscosities and melting points of rocks.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.D:
Weather and Climate
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.D: The foundation for Earth's...The foundation for Earth's global climate systems is the electromagnetic radiation from the sun, as well as its reflection, absorption, storage, and redistribution among the atmosphere, ocean, and land systems, and this energy's re-radiation into space.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.D: Gradual atmospheric changes...Gradual atmospheric changes were due to plants and other organisms that captured carbon dioxide and released oxygen.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.D: Changes in the atmosphere...Changes in the atmosphere due to human activity have increased carbon dioxide concentrations and thus affect climate.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.D: Current models predict that...Current models predict that, although future regional climate changes will be complex and varied, average global temperatures will continue to rise. The outcomes predicted by global climate models strongly depend on the amounts of human-generated greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere each year and by the ways in which these gases are absorbed by the ocean and biosphere.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.E:
Biogeology
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS2.E: The many dynamic...The many dynamic and delicate feedbacks between the biosphere and other Earth systems cause a continual co-evolution of Earth's surface and the life that exists on it.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3
Earth and Human Activity
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.A:
Natural Resources
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.A: Resource availability has guided...Resource availability has guided the development of human society.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.A: All forms of energy production...All forms of energy production and other resource extraction have associated economic, social, environmental, and geopolitical costs and risks as well as benefits. New technologies and social regulations can change the balance of these factors.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.B:
Natural Hazards
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.B: Natural hazards and other...Natural hazards and other geologic events have shaped the course of human history; [they] have significantly altered the sizes of human populations and have driven human migrations.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.C:
Human Impacts on Earth Systems
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.C: The sustainability of human...The sustainability of human societies and the biodiversity that supports them requires responsible management of natural resources.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.C: Scientists and engineers can make...Scientists and engineers can make major contributions by developing technologies that produce less pollution and waste and that preclude ecosystem degradation.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.D:
Global Climate Change
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.D: Though the magnitudes of human...Though the magnitudes of human impacts are greater than they have ever been, so too are human abilities to model, predict, and manage current and future impacts.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ESS3.D: Through computer simulations...Through computer simulations and other studies, important discoveries are still being made about how the ocean, the atmosphere, and the biosphere interact and are modified in response to human activities.
(see CLEAN Resources)
Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.

High School - Engineering, Technology, and Applications of Sciencein CLEAN

Performance Expectation (PE)Disciplinary Core Idea (DCI)DCI Concept Bullet
HS-ETS1:
Engineering Design
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.A:
Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.A: Criteria and constraints also include...Criteria and constraints also include satisfying any requirements set by society, such as taking issues of risk mitigation into account, and they should be quantified to the extent possible and stated in such a way that one can tell if a given design meets them.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.A: Humanity faces major global challenges...Humanity faces major global challenges today, such as the need for supplies of clean water and food or for energy sources that minimize pollution, which can be addressed through engineering. These global challenges also may have manifestations in local communities.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.B:
Developing Possible Solutions
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.B: When evaluating solutions...When evaluating solutions, it is important to take into account a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, and to consider social, cultural, and environmental impacts.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.B: Both physical models and computers...Both physical models and computers can be used in various ways to aid in the engineering design process. Computers are useful for a variety of purposes, such as running simulations to test different ways of solving a problem or to see which one is most efficient or economical; and in making a persuasive presentation to a client about how a given design will meet his or her needs.
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.C:
Optimizing the Design Solution
(see CLEAN Resources)
HS-ETS1.C: Criteria may need to be...Criteria may need to be broken down into simpler ones that can be approached systematically, and decisions about the priority of certain criteria over others (trade-offs) may be needed.

(see CLEAN Resources)

Note: Limited to standards that are relevant to climate and energy science.


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