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2013 CLN Teleconferences (January -June 2013)

June 25, 2013: Informal discussion

President Obama is giving a speech today at 1:35pm ET at Georgetown University on climate change. The speech will be broadcast live at http:/www.georgetown.edu We can have a discussion about this and Obama's Climate Action Plan - released last night, and then break to hear his speech.

President's Climate Action Plan (Acrobat (PDF) 291kB Jun25 13)

Obama's Plan to Cut Carbon Pollution (Acrobat (PDF) 103kB Jun25 13)

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 14.5MB Jun25 13).


June 18, 2013: Informal discussion

There is no audio recording of this teleconference call. There were no slides.


June 11, 2013: Informal discussion

There is no audio recording of this teleconference call. There were no slides.


June 4, 2013: Informal discussion

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 10.4MB Jun4 13). There were no slides.


May 28, 2013: Social Media: How Can CLEAN Effectively Use Social Media - What are the messages and what mechanisms would be most effective? (3rd of 3 Sessions) Tamara Ledley from TERC, Martha Shaw from EarthAdvertising, Ellen Klicka and Maureen Moses from AMS, Emily Kellagher from CIRES University of Colorado.

We will be creating a strategy for a social media campaign for CLEAN. We will discuss 3 components:

1. Messages

2. Goals

3. Platforms

SAMPLE STRATEGY FOR CLEAN SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN

What is the objective?

To increase the usage of CLEAN's resources

Promoting excellence in education around climate and energy literacy - using resources is one way to do that (Pedagogical support pages)

Affirm quality of the resources - part of mission statement

Mission in a social media campaign - increase usage of resources

How do we plan to do this?

Expand the community (listserv) to 1000 in 2013 and encourage the community to take greater advantage of CLEAN resources (increase the level of engagement),

Encourage that community to take advantage of the resources.

Other things on the web site.

Make presentations sortable - CAMEL has tagging for presentations

Success of social media campaign - dependent on quality of the resources.

What is the single most important thing we want the audience to take away?

CLEAN is the only comprehensive resource library (digest) for climate literacy materials.

Promote the peer review aspect - unique, and selling point

Resources - not only the reviewed collection. - look at why people are part of this network

REWRITE - TO BE MORE ENCOMPASSING

CLEAN is the watering hole for climate literacy information, best resource for climate literacy and engagement

Why they should they believe this?

The CLEAN Collection has over 500 rigorously reviewed educational resources on climate and energy

CLEAN is a network of over 400 climate education professionals and leaders, and over 60 professional societies, who contribute and vet materials.

Who is the #1 target audience?

Science educators

Wider audience:

Educators, Scientists,Professional societies,Curriculum developers,Economists, Urban planners,Social media specialists,Technologists,Park rangers,Policy makers,Writers,Journalists,Thought leaders,Editors

two audiences - people in CLEAN Network and science educators (climate is a small part of what they do)

2nd tier of campaign - market to the listserv who reach out to educators

What is the call to action?

Join the CLEAN listserv

Engage with the CLEAN Facebook page, Twitter (new)

What is a secondary call to action?

Check out the CLEAN library (digest)

Social Media Platforms:

-Twitter (tweet more and get more followers: be active with postings, mention others, mention twitter handle, #climate, etc)

See new CLEAN twitter page: @ClimateLit

-Hashtag use during meetings including AGU, GSA and other conferences where CLEAN is present

-Facebook

-eMail (eMarketing) - send out emails to various listserv's

-Slideshare (see http://www.slideshare.net/what-to-upload-at-slideshare?utm_source=what-to-upload&utm_medium=ssemail&utm_campaign=upload_digest&cmp_src=upload_digest)

(see http://www.slideshare.net/MarthaShaw)

(see Andy Revkin slideshare posts)

-Distribute digest highlighting/showcasing resources

-Cross-Link information posted to facebook, twitter, etc.

-Syndication

- Post photos

- GOOGLE Hangout with visiting experts - could be done less frequently than CLEAN Network call and done at a time that teachers can participate - have a high profile person.

Engagement Methods:

Award and distribute a CLEAN resource of the week

Contest to post how you used CLEAN for prizes

Announcement of winners

Announcement of Resource of the Week

Ask for comments

Time frame: December 2013

Team members: Existing listserv

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 20.3MB May28 13). There were no slides.


May 21, 2013: Social Media: How Organizations and High Level Individuals Effectively Use Social Media to Communicate Climate and Energy Information and Opportunities (2nd of 3 Sessions) Ellen Klicka and Maureen Moses from AMS,

Abstract:

Many of the principles that make social media a powerful communication tool for personal use can be applied to organizations. This presentation reviews some examples of how organizations and high-profile individuals have leveraged social networks as strategic tools to accomplish their communications goals. We also will present concepts and ideas that will help you get more out of your experiences consuming social media content and perhaps inspire you to apply some concepts in your organizations.

Bios:
Ellen Klicka has been consulting to the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Policy Program since 2011 on communications strategy, media relations, marketing and social media. Ellen manages projects for the AMS Subcommittee on Renewable Energy and Water Resources Committee. She also has supported the AMS Policy Program workshop series, including Earth Observations, Science and Services for the 21st Century and Climate Information Needs for Financial Decision Making. Before earning her MBA, Ellen spent eight years in corporate communications and public relations management positions in the private sector. Ellen holds an MBA from The George Washington University and a bachelor's degree from MIT.

During her undergraduate career Maureen Moses participated in an NSF-REU internship at the Carnegie Institution of Science studying high pressure geochemistry of the Earth's core, participated aboard the Scripps Institution of Oceanography PLUME cruise and graduated from San Diego State University with a bachelor's of science in Geological Sciences focusing on igneous petrology. Following her undergraduate career, she continued her studies at Central Washington University researching magmatic processes and petrology at Mount Etna. She then worked at the American Geosciences Institute in public policy focusing on STEM Education and Natural Hazard legislation. She continues her career as part of the education program at the American Meteorological Society, and spearheaded the division's social media launch in 2012.

The slides for this discussion are here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 480kB May21 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 530kB May20 13)

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 21MB May21 13).


May 14, 2013: Review of climate content of final draft of NGSS: An informal discussion with Rebecca Anderson - Alliance for Climate Education, Frank Niepold - NOAA, Mark McCaffrey - National Center for Science Education and Scott Carley - College of Exploration

The slides for this discussion are here (PowerPoint 351kB May14 13)

Google doc for notes from the discussion on the NGSS Next Steps

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 20.8MB May14 13).


May 7, 2013: Social Media: How Individuals Can Effectively Use Social Media to Receive and Disseminate Information (1st of 3 Sessions) Emily Kellagher from CIRES Univ of Colorado Boulder

Abstract:
Why do you use social media? It is a pretty popular question these days. Whether you're a person, represent a business, or simply still on the fence about reasons to use social media, Emily Kellagher will give you an overview of the various social media platforms and some suggestions on how you can use social media professionally. With an emphasis on Facebook, she will also give you a few tips on how to use Facebook efficiently, tips for setting up a professional account or splitting an existing account into professional and personal purposes. She will end on a quick overview of her work in Social Media.

Bio:
Science Educator, education technology and curriculum specialist. Emily Kellagher MsEd has a 20 year career in education and education leadership. She loves working with teachers and education professional to meet the need for quality science education. Emily manages the social media accounts for the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) Education Outreach group. She is also actively involved in the social media groups at the University of Colorado at Boulder, where groups inform each other of events and significant posts and preform collaborative social media campaigns. She is excited to share her knowledge and insights about various aspects of social media with the CLEAN community.

Emily's slides are here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 8.9MB May7 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 3.4MB May7 13).

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 19.8MB May7 13).


April 30, 2013: Informal discussion

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 15.2MB May1 13).


April 23, 2013: Eugenie Scott, Executive Director, National Center for Science Education
Title: Déjà vu All Over Again: Comparing Opposition to Evolution and Opposition to Anthropogenic Global Warming

Abstract: Both evolution and global warming are "controversial issues" in education, but are not controversial in the world of science. There is remarkable similarity in the techniques that are used by both camps to promote their views. The scientific issues are presented as "not being settled", or that there is considerable debate among scientists over the validity of claims. Denialists in both camps practice "anomaly mongering", in which a small detail seemingly incompatible with either evolution or global warming is held up as dispositive of either evolution or of climate science. Although in both cases, reputable, established science is under attack for ideological reasons, the underlying ideology differs: for denying evolution, the ideology of course is religious; for denying global warming, the ideology is political and/or economic.

Bio: Eugenie Scott, a former university professor, is the Executive Director of the National Center for Science Education (NCSE). She has been both a researcher and an activist in the creationism/evolution controversy for over twenty-five years, with an interest in many components of this controversy, including the educational, legal, scientific, religious, and social issues. Genie is the author of Evolution vs Creationism and co-editor, with Glenn Branch, of Not in Our Classrooms: Why Intelligent Design Is Wrong for Our Schools. She holds a Ph.D from the University of Missouri in Physical Anthropology.

Genie's slides are here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 6.5MB Apr22 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 3.5MB Apr22 13).

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 25.4MB Apr25 13).


April 16, 2013: Ms. DaNel Hogan, Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, U.S. Department of Energy
Title: Energy Literacy: Framework and Resources

Abstract: A walk through Energy Literacy: Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts for Energy Education (A Framework for Energy Education for Learners of All Ages), a taste of work related to the Energy Literacy Initiative led by the Department of Energy, and a look at some great resources which can be used to engage learners through energy education.

Bio: see http://www.trianglecoalition.org/einstein-fellows/current-fellows/danel-hogan

DaNel's presentation will be done using prezi (http://prezi.com). Members will receive the Prezi link via email. Her slides are here (Acrobat (PDF) 15.8MB Apr15 13) as backup for those unable to use Prezi.

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 19.2MB Apr16 13).


April 9, 2013: Informal discussion

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 13.8MB Apr12 13).


April 2, 2013: Informal discussion

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 16.3MB Apr9 13).


March 26, 2013: Informal discussion

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 14.7MB Apr9 13).


March 19, 2013: Craig Johnson, Georgia Schmitt, Cassie Severson, Cale Cook, and Michael Stockton
Title: Engaging the World on Climate Change – The Experiences of School of Environmental Studies Students at COP 18 (Nov/Dec 2012) in Doha, Qatar

Abstract: The School of Environmental Studies (SES) is a public high school located on the grounds of the Minnesota Zoo in Apple Valley, Minnesota. One of five high schools of Independent School District 196, it is a "School of Choice" for juniors and seniors in the district or for students from outside the district who choose to enroll. The mission and vision of the school compel the administration, staff, and students to examine the relationships between people and their environments in experiential, integrated and authentic ways.

Climate change has been a part of the SES curriculum for several years, becoming more foundational in large part due to several major initiatives envisioned and implemented in partnership with the Will Steger Foundation, a key institutional partner of the school since 2006. The most recent of these initiatives has been institutional accreditation and participation at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) International Conference of the Parties (COP) held each November. Accredited through the School of Environmental Studies Education Foundation (SESEF), selected SES seniors attend the COP Conferences as official observers and civil society delegates. In this role, the student delegates attend conference presentations, observe official conference deliberations, and network with and learn from delegates from all over the world about aspects of the climate change issue important to them. COP 18 in Doha, Qatar was the third COP conference that SES student delegates have attended.

Bios:

Craig Johnson is the senior Environmental Studies teacher at the School of Environmental Studies in Apple Valley, Minnesota.

Hello! I'm Georgia Schmitt. Like the other students, I'm a senior at the School of Environmental Studies in Minnesota. Outside of school, I compete on the speech team at Apple Valley High School, explore the outdoors, and volunteer with friends. I'm leaning towards attending Grinnell College in the fall, and I'm interested in all of the earth sciences, English, international relations, and psychology. Attending the conference this winter was an incredible experience and has since sparked new interests and opened many doors for me. I'm truly grateful for the opportunity and new insight.





My name is Cassie Severson and I am a senior at the School of Environmental Studies in Apple Valley, Minnesota. Next year, I will be attending Gustavus Adolphus College to pursue a Biology major and Spanish minor leading me on the track to medical school with a goal to be a psychiatrist. I'm very grateful that I was able to attend COP18 in Doha, Qatar last year. The experience was life changing for me and allowed me to grow as a person in many positive ways.







Hi, my name is Cale Cook. I am a senior at the School of Environmental Studies. I decided to attend SES my junior year, solely for the reason of trying something new and maybe looking at things in a new way. It definitely changed me. I was not really sure where I stood on climate change issues but I was open to the subject. Throughout my junior year I learned a lot about it and it became much more prevalent in my life. At the beginning of my senior year I was given the opportunity to attend the COP conference in Doha. I saw and took this opportunity to learn a more about something that was growing in importance in my life. I got really into it and hope to do a lot with it in the future!





Hi, I'm Michael Stockton and I am a senior at the School of Environmental Studies. I have been interested in the environment my entire life and SES was definitely a great fit for me. When the opportunity presented itself to attend the COP18 Climate Change Conference I could not refuse. Looking back, COP18 definitely made a large impression on me. It helped shape my views on both climate change and the world as a whole. I will take the lessons I learned there with me to college and beyond.



The slides for this presentation are here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 26.3MB Mar18 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 1.5MB Mar18 13).

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 21.8MB Mar20 13).


March 12, 2013: Informal discussion about climate education sessions to recommend for the AGU 2013 Fall Meeting

Here is a link to a Google doc which identifies ideas that have been put forward, the sessions that we organized last year, and people who are interested in being convenors. Note: you can now edit the document to add new ideas and indicate your interest in participating. We will discuss this on March 12th.

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 19.9MB Mar12 13).


March 5, 2013: Austin Brown, National Renewable Energy Laboratory
Topic: BITES (Building, Industry, Transportation, and Electricity Scenarios) Tool http://bites.nrel.gov

Abstract: The Buildings Industry Transportation Electricity Scenarios (BITES) Tool is a scenario-based tool for analyzing how changes in energy demand and supply by economic sector can impact carbon dioxide emissions. BITES permits the rapid screening and exploration of energy options and technologies that can lead to major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and reductions in oil dependence. The analytical framework behind the BITES tool was originally developed to help inform internal planning and budgeting activities within the U.S. Department of Energy. However, BITES also provides a solid foundation for learning about the U.S. energy system as a whole. BITES can support learning about the interrelationships within the U.S. energy system and investigate potential future pathways for the energy economy.

This webinar will cover an introduction to BITES, some example uses, and ways to get involved in using BITES to enhance climate and energy literacy.

Bio: Austin Brown is a senior analyst in the Washington, DC office of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). His work focuses on clean transportation, including efficient and electrified vehicles, renewable fuels, and transportation system interactions with the built environment. He also moonlights as Deputy Chief Technology Officer for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the U.S. Department of Energy, specializing in energy analysis, tools, and opening up data sets for innovation. Recently, he joined the adjunct faculty at Johns Hopkins University's Advanced Academic Programs, teaching "Transportation Policy in a Carbon Constrained World."

Austin's slides are here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 2.4MB Mar5 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 2MB Mar5 13).

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (M4A Audio 14MB Mar7 13). Unfortunately we were not able to capture a video recording of Austin's demo. With this audio recording and access to the bites.nrel.gov website (and the slides) you should be able to follow along.


February 26, 2013: Peg Steffen and Bruce Moravchik, NOAA
Title: NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project

Abstract: Climate Stewards is a project in it 3rd year with proven success increasing educator climate knowledge and providing support for classroom and community stewardship projects. Using webinars, collaborative space, workshops, discussion groups, and a regional organizational structure, formal and informal educators become part of an active learning community.
http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/climate-stewards/

Bio: Peg Steffen is a former teacher with 25 years of experience in biology, physics, astronomy/geology, and environmental science teaching in high school and college. In 2000, she was an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow at NASA where she became a program manager and started the NASA Explorer Schools program. Since 2006, she has been an education coordinator for NOAA's National Ocean Service, working to provide professional development programs and online products in environmental literacy and climate.
(http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education and http://Games.noaa.gov )

Bio: Bruce Moravchik has been with NOAA since 1999 developing online materials and workshops (http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/), for students and educators that convey ocean, coastal and earth science research and technology of the National Ocean Service (NOS). As an NOS education specialist he currently manages NOAA Climate Stewards project. Prior to working at NOAA he established field based marine and environmental studies program at a private high school in Rhode Island. Bruce taught oceanography for the Sea Education Association; studied the behavioral ecology of lobster and crab populations in Rhode Island and Maine; and conducted research in coral reef ecology in the Red Sea.

Peg and Bruce's slides are here (PowerPoint 16.6MB Feb15 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 5MB Feb15 13).

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 20MB Feb26 13).


February 19, 2013: Discussion - Renaming CLN to CLEAN?

Discussion: In words we would call ourselves the Climate and Energy Literacy Network. With the recognition that CLEAN now has, the fact some refer to our teleconference as the "CLEAN teleconference", and that energy is an important part of the picture in addressing climate change it seems time to complete the transition. Tamara Ledley will lead this discussion. We will also talk about a implementing a survey of CLN/CLEAN members to learn more about how our members see the value of our community.

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 23.2MB Feb19 13).


February 12, 2013: Laura Faye Tenenbaum, Education Specialist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Title: Don't Miss Out: Experience the Latest and Most Amazing New Resources at NASA's Global Climate Change Website

Abstract: This past year, the Earth and Climate Science Communication Team at JPL has made enhancements, upgrades and additions to NASA's Global Climate Change Website http://climate.nasa.gov/. These include a new "Meteorologist Center" with full screen graphics, a downloadable tip sheet for new media users, scripted events and images to the Eyes on the Earth 3D portal and more. Our team has had a robust relationship with the CLN team, so please join this telecon so we can continue this fruitful evolution.

Bio: Ms. Laura Faye Tenenbaum is an Education Specialist on the Earth Science Communications Team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory as well as a science teacher who understands directly the needs of her students. She has developed methods to engage and educate students, teachers, and other professionals in climate and environmental science by using the emerging possibilities of new media to share her imaginative creations with original videos, slideshows, and interactive learning projects, in addition to live seminars and lecture series, conference presentations and web seminars with climate educators and others in the field. Her goal is to bring science, multimedia and education together to attract a highly motivated and enthusiastic new generation that will be ready to take on the huge environmental challenges we face.

Laura Faye Tenenbaum is an Innovator in Science Communication and a member of the Earth Science Communications Team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where she is responsible for creating content for the climate website "Global Climate Change: Vital Signs of the Planet" http://climate.nasa.gov/ . She develops original videos and other interactive new media products to engage and educate students, teachers, and other professionals in climate and environmental science. Her team won two Webby Awards, the Internet industry's highest honor, for Best Science Website. She also holds a faculty position in the Physical Science Department at Glendale Community College for the last 11 years, where she has been nominated for Adjunct Faculty of the Year.

Ms. Tenenbaum studied Marine Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz as both an undergraduate and graduate student. She lived in Southeast Asia during the 90's and travelled extensively. She worked as an Underwater Researcher on the Kelp Forest Project at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, as a Senior Marine Consultant for Santa Monica Baykeepers, as an Underwater Scientist for the World Wildlife Fund in Thailand, and taught SCUBA in Thailand, Sri Lanka and Hong Kong.

Her goal is to bring science, multimedia and education together to attract a highly motivated and enthusiastic new generation that will be ready to take on the huge environmental challenges we face.

Laura's slides are here (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 15.9MB Feb6 13) and here (Acrobat (PDF) 19.5MB Feb8 13). It will be useful to be able to access the http://climate.nasa.gov/ website during Laura's presentation.

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 19.3MB Feb12 13).


February 5, 2013: Informal discussion

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 19MB Feb6 13).


January 29, 2013: Informal discussion of summary document about CLN and the NGSS

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 14.2MB Jan30 13).


January 22, 2013: Next Generation Science Standards - Second Public Review - development of comments - SCHEDULED FOR 2 HOURS TO PROVIDE TIME TO ADDRESS ALL COMMENTS (1-3PM ET)

Drafts of the CLN comments are on this Google Drive document We will be discussing and refining them today. You can also edit, add comments, and add issues/standards that you would like discussed and have the CLN provide feedback on in this document

The second draft of the NGSS were released on Jan 8th. You can access them here

For other useful information refer to the Jan 15, 2013 teleconference notes below.

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 40.1MB Jan23 13).


January 15, 2013: Next Generation Science Standards - Second Public Review - substantial discussion

To prepare for this discussion, we recommend that you review the comments (Microsoft Word 72kB Jan8 13) that the CLN submitted for the first public review in May 2012. Does the new January 2013 draft address our earlier concerns?

As background, Scott Carley has collected together a number of useful figures (Acrobat (PDF) 4.3MB Jan8 13) from NSTA and his own work. Here are the spreadsheets (Excel 47kB Jan8 13) that Scott and Frank Niepold developed in May to look at how those draft performance expectations relate to the climate literacy principles and concepts.

The second draft of the NGSS were released on Jan 8th. You can access them here

First Draft of the NGSS released in May 2012 (Acrobat (PDF) 8.6MB Jan15 13)

If you have comments and can not make the call please post them on this Google Drive document


Link to comments on some of the standards from Rebecca Anderson from ACE

I've been taking a look at the 2nd NGSS draft and made some notes that I wanted to share with you as I tried to make sense of it all.
I created a table with the 1st and 2nd drafts of the standards lined up next to each other (same doc), so it's a bit easier to see what changes were made to each standard. There are some cases where 2 standards were combined into one or a new standard was added (carbon cycle!) that didn't exist in the first draft, but most of them I was able to match up visually. (Disclaimer that I made all these matches by hand, so I'm not claiming they're perfect.)
I did not include every standard for the 2 new categories for middle and high school for Earth's Systems and Earth and Human Activity -- only the ones that seemed relevant to climate, energy and sustainability that I was interested in. If someone else wants to add the rest just for completeness, that's fine with me.
One thing I noticed right up front is that there is no longer a specific category for Climate Change as there was in the first draft at the high school level. All the specific performance expectations were incorporated into the 2 remaining DCIs (Disciplinary Content Areas), but it is a bit of a shame that we lost a stand-alone topic.
Please feel free to share the link to this document to the group on the call tomorrow if it's helpful. I'll be calling in but will be in the car, so won't have the document in front of me. Matt Lappe can speak for me, though. I made the doc available to anyone with the link, so there shouldn't be any trouble sharing it.
I haven't done any thorough comparison of the individual standards yet nor have I made any comments in the doc (other than the notes up top), but it'd be easy for people to submit comments to different standards here and use that as a tool for collecting feedback.
Thanks - let me know if you have any questions,
Rebecca


There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 19.1MB Jan15 13).


January 8, 2013: Next Generation Science Standards - Second Public Review - strategy for our review. Here is the link to the NGSS site

There is an audio recording of this teleconference call here (MP3 Audio 12.1MB Jan8 13).


January 1, 2013: Cancelled due to New Years Day